"I climbed the tree to see the world"

2013-09-16

As most of my recent entries have taken the form of a response to some other post, let me continue this trend.

My response this time is to David Byttow's post from earlier this summer, called "Always Be Coding: How to Land an Engineering Job". I read the post in July, but my head was not where it is now. Dev Bootcamp's Dave Hoover tweeted it just a few days ago, and the timing could not have been better.

Having just finished my Phase 0 Ruby assessment, I've now just about a month until class starts. I'm pretty excited, and in a previous post I detailed my intention to make sure that I will not allow any stasis to take place between now and then . This time for me is, I think, quite valuable.

Considering my prior thoughts in this regard, ABC: Always Be Coding reappared just as I have been scouring the landscape for more mental ammunition. The part that stood out for me was Byttow's quote of Eric Schmidt, saying, "Repitition doesn't spoil the prayer."

Taking this, I looked at the rest of the piece; what could I practice? Byttow lists a number of suggestions, particularly the passages regarding word problems, data structures, and common algorithms. These are things that I have always found interesting (or at least, the idea of them, being largely ignorant as to their specifics), but have never known where to start. Well, that's over. I know where to start.

And I have started. Since re-reading this piece a few days ago, I've been reading and writing code nearly nonstop. Aside from my work on Flashcalcjs, I've been inspired to take a look at sorting algorithms. An excellent series from Computerphile on sorting was both informative and fun, so I jumped in that direction. You can see my progress so far here.

Maybe this type of thing is droll to those with more established theoretical foundations, but as someone whose background in science begins with "political" rather than "computer", I find it novel and thrilling.

Title take from The Cinematic Orchestra's "To Build A Home"